16 February 2007

Chaos Study

A few people have linked to this Guardian article about various famous writers' rooms. I looked at them all and thought, "Wow, those are clean! How do they work there?!"

I have trouble working in an uncluttered space. Chaos comforts me. I know that just about anything I need is probably buried in a pile somewhere around me. I'm good with piles. I understand their logic.

At least twice a year I make an effort to organize things. Or at least organize the chaos a bit more. It usually lasts a couple days, maybe a week. I enjoy the order, but am seldom productive in it. There's something threatening within such clarity.

Each to their own. My work room is particularly cluttered at the moment, so I took a couple pictures:




Perhaps the Guardian article will encourage other people to post pictures of where they write, and perhaps a few of those people will be as fond of clutter as I...

14 comments:

  1. Cheney, you call that clutter? Child's play.

    jeff ford

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  2. Well, I'm still young.... And I've only been in this apartment five years.

    Come on, Jeff, show me worse!

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  3. My work den is similarly cluttered - it's not a mess, it's just man-at-work clutter, I guess. I could see myself being more productive at places like yours than at the sunny neo-classic deco places from the Gardian piece.

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  4. My car is worse than your office.


    jeff ford

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  5. I don't mind clutter, and I am a big fan of piles, but I need a certain amount of order. I can't have stuff strewn about willy-nilly. That kills all my creativity. I can't feel comfortable unless there's a certain minimal organization. It's something of a balancing act.

    Sterile environments, however, are much worse.

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  6. After looking at these pictures I feel a little better about the chaos around here. (Mine is much, much worse, but I've had 15 years. You'll get there.)

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  7. How odd. htI have that same New Yorker cover on my wall. It was the first decoration I put up after I moved in--let's check the date on the cover--eight years ago.

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  8. Hello, Matthew! Your blog inspired me (thank you). Please check out my work space photos here: http://denver.yourhub.com/Parker/Blogs/Arts-Entertainment/Literature/Writing/Blog~185188.aspx

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  9. Hello again, everyone. Allow me to make my blog entry into a hyperlink. There.

    Thanks for the read.

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  10. If I had a desk, I'd take a photo for you. But because I live in a tiny apartment, my clutter is strewn all over the place. (And the 50-70 books arriving from publishers every month don't do much to help.)

    For evidence, go here.

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  11. James -- Glad to know that NYer cover has inspired somebody else. It's kind of a vision of utopia for me. Snob heaven, maybe, but nonetheless...

    Tabitha -- great! I think I put up this post primarily to satisfy my own voyeuristic urges by inspiring other people to post pictures of their writing spaces.

    Maud -- Strewn! It's my second-favorite word after clutter! So glad to see it!

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  12. Matthew -- no matter your intention, yours was a fun blog to come across. I plan to stop by again as time allows. Take care.

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  14. I echo other sentiments expressed here, i.e.: Pshaw! You think that's cluttered?

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